Tom Mcgurk, Opinion /

Historical echoes in Britain’s EU departure

Historical echoes in Britain’s EU departure

Severing oneself from the world’s biggest market looks like lunacy – but we did it ourselves a century ago this weekend

Brexiteers are blind to the threats to peace

Brexiteers are blind to the threats to peace

John Major’s warning of the ‘wild men on the fringes’ is a stark reminder to Westminster

It’s time for SF to stand up and be counted

It’s time for SF to stand up and be counted

Given how the parliamentary arithmetic has fallen in the Brexit scenario, by abstaining from the critical Westminster vote, the party is in effect voting against May’s deal

Yes, we can

Yes, we can

Last weekend’s unforgettable win over the All Blacks proved that Ireland are now the team to beat. But it’s been a long, hard journey to this point

The choice is simple: The May deal or chaos

The choice is simple: The May deal or chaos

When all’s said and done, the House of Commons won’t vote for a Brexit crash-out

Rugby is at a crossroads of its own making

Rugby is at a crossroads of its own making

Ireland v New Zealand will be the highlight of autumn friendlies. But might it be the last hurrah?

Salute WWI dead, but not with red poppies

Salute WWI dead, but not with red poppies

Not only does the symbol help to sanitise an imperial bloodbath, it also legitimises contemporary warmongering

Demand for amnesty adds to families’ grief

Demand for amnesty adds to families’ grief

Questions about alleged security force collusion in killings in the North must still be answered

Brexit is starting to feel like Suez all over again

Brexit is starting to feel like Suez all over again

Britain’s post-imperial hangover has lasted for generations, right up to today’s Brexiteers

Is elitism pushing GAA players too far?

Is elitism pushing GAA players too far?

An ESRI report on the GAA shows that the demands made of amateur players are creating a burnout crisis for 18 to 21-year-olds

A journalist and editor who changed Ireland

A journalist and editor who changed Ireland

The late John Mulcahy, whose magazine Hibernia reflected and chronicled the turbulent and transformative 1960s and 1970s, leaves behind a rich journalistic legacy

Protesting against Trump’s visit is reckless showboating

Protesting against Trump’s visit is reckless showboating

Massive marches and a secondhand hot-air balloon only risk antagonising a politician who Ireland badly needs onside

Migrant crisis could prove undoing of EU

Migrant crisis could prove undoing of EU

Tensions over migration, and opposition to it, are striking at the heart of the European Union’s political and social purpose

Why Irish rugby has the world at its feet

Why Irish rugby has the world at its feet

Ranked second only to New Zealand, our national team has a real chance to win the World Cup next year in Japan

A short walk, but a long struggle

A short walk, but a long struggle

Fifty years ago this Friday, the North witnessed its first ever civil rights march: a four-mile walk from Coalisland to Dungannon in Co Tyrone. The protest lit the fuse for a firestorm of political tumult that has yet to fully play out