Tuesday September 22, 2020

Now election silly season is over, let’s talk economic reality

Promises were made, but the truth is that our best-laid plans could easily be overturned by international events outside our control

9th February, 2020
4
Micheál Martin, Leo Varadkar and Mary Lou McDonald during last week’s RTÉ leaders' debate. Parties’ spending projections were predicated on the heroic assumptions that overall economic growth would continue. Picture: Niall Carson/PA Wire

Now that the voting is over for Election 2020 – and we’ve heard all of the political promises on what the new government might do with our money – it‘s time to return to some realistic talk about the future of our economy . . . and how international events outside of our control could render much of what we’ve heard as nonsense.

All of the spending projections and tax returns were predicated...

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