Gut instinct and engineering nous lead to a food health fix

When engineer Aonghus Shortt’s wife began to suffer from a food intolerance, he made it his business to find a solution

Emmet Ryan

Technology Correspondent @emmetjryan
28th February, 2021
Gut instinct and engineering nous lead to a food health fix
Aonghus Shortt, chief executive of FoodMarble, developed a device called Aire that helps people work out what foods they are able to digest by using breath analysis

Aonghus Shortt is an engineer. And you don’t need to look at his qualifications to know that. He has a degree in mechanical engineering and a PhD in electrical engineering, but the more obvious giveaway is how the now chief executive of FoodMarble reacted when his wife discovered she had a food intolerance.

Something needed fixing, and that’s what engineers do. Shortt just took it further than most of his ilk, growing a...

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