Why co-living plans for our cities failed to live up to their promise

Our legislators have failed to realise that, when built as an integral part of an overall residential plan, well-designed and well-located co-living schemes can offer a positive contribution to urban living

29th November, 2020
Why co-living plans for our cities failed to live up to their promise
The narrative of ‘glorified bedsits’ that has been associated with this form of development has been unfortunate – one of the key components of co-living is the creation of community among tenants

In light of the recent announcement by Minister for Housing Darragh O’Brien to ban all future co-living developments, one can’t help but feel that the concept has been gravely misunderstood by vast swathes of the Irish population.

I say that as someone who has stayed in several of these schemes in other jurisdictions and someone with a good understanding of the merits of a well-designed and well-located co-living scheme.

It has...

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