Stephen Kinsella, Opinion /

We must get ready for robots

We must get ready for robots

Globotics, the combination of globalisation and robotics, is on the horizon and Ireland must prepare now

Shadow banks: Dodgy dealers or misunderstood innovators?

Shadow banks: Dodgy dealers or misunderstood innovators?

Firms all over Dublin administer parts of the global shadow banking system, but it is the Irish Central Bank which has built up the first fully formed picture of this world. Others now need to share what they know about this intriguing arm of the financial system

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Unless we have good data and good oversight of the shadow banks operating in Ireland, where they come from and what they’re here for, we cannot understand the likely consequences for us when they hit good or bad times

‘Think it possible you may be mistaken’: Four impertinent questions for 2019

‘Think it possible you may be mistaken’: Four impertinent questions for 2019

It is important that we ask the right questions. It is vitally important that we understand the degree of uncertainty of any answer

Government must support diversification of enterprise

Government must support diversification of enterprise

The national finances are once again becoming heavily dependent on one narrow, highly profitable sector of the economy. Sound familiar?

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Faced with a massive accumulated deficit in housing, health and education, the only tools we have available to us are fiscal policy and luck. We know from the past that luck eventually runs out.

What the state is doing right: part four

What the state is doing right: part four

Today, I want to finish my series on what the state gets right by looking at the state’s response to Brexit since 2015. Yes, you read that correctly: 2015. I also want to reflect on what the state is doing to get us ready for the future.

What the state is doing right: part three

What the state is doing right: part three

From running our libraries to helping vulnerable children, to buying things in a smart way, to using technology to get us new passports and new services, to helping guide policy, the state is doing more for us than any of us know.

What the state is doing right: Part two

What the state is doing right: Part two

You’ll hear all about it when health organisations get something wrong, as you should. They are dealing with vulnerable people and should always aim to improve. But will you hear about it when they get things right, and make things better for people?

No time for triumphalism

No time for triumphalism

With the border backstop safely secured, Ireland’s next move must be to help Britain through the cataclysm of Brexit and resist the temptation to kick it when it’s down

What the state is doing right: Part one

What the state is doing right: Part one

There are many, many reasons to hold the state to account for its failings. But for once, let’s not do that. Let’s look carefully at the parts of the state quietly working to make life better for everybody. We take the state, and the people who make it work, for granted too often

Stephen Kinsella on Brexit

Stephen Kinsella on Brexit

There are not enough people, no systems, no actual borders set up to deal with Brexit. And 85 per cent of the time given to sort this out has already passed. As my mother repeatedly told me while I was cramming for exams, you can’t fatten the pig the night before the fair

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Why should US or Indian or Chinese monetary policy concern Ireland? So much of what we call ‘industrial policy’ here is really policy for US-based multinationals. Changes to the banking system in the US, and more importantly business conditions there, can signal either good or bad times for us.

Home economics: 'Ownership is everything'

Home economics: 'Ownership is everything'

Housing policy is always political, but it has created a deeply politicised group of people in the have-nots. These people are typically younger and poorer. They are sometimes called ‘millennials’, but I like to think of them as people who are nearly 40

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

There have never been more workers, and they have never paid more in tax than today. Household disposable incomes are higher now than they were during the boom, and there are proportionately fewer children as a percentage of the population to look after. Why, then, is there a child poverty problem in this country?