Stephen Kinsella, Opinion /

What the state is doing right: part three

What the state is doing right: part three

From running our libraries to helping vulnerable children, to buying things in a smart way, to using technology to get us new passports and new services, to helping guide policy, the state is doing more for us than any of us know.

What the state is doing right: Part two

What the state is doing right: Part two

You’ll hear all about it when health organisations get something wrong, as you should. They are dealing with vulnerable people and should always aim to improve. But will you hear about it when they get things right, and make things better for people?

No time for triumphalism

No time for triumphalism

With the border backstop safely secured, Ireland’s next move must be to help Britain through the cataclysm of Brexit and resist the temptation to kick it when it’s down

What the state is doing right: Part one

What the state is doing right: Part one

There are many, many reasons to hold the state to account for its failings. But for once, let’s not do that. Let’s look carefully at the parts of the state quietly working to make life better for everybody. We take the state, and the people who make it work, for granted too often

Stephen Kinsella on Brexit

Stephen Kinsella on Brexit

There are not enough people, no systems, no actual borders set up to deal with Brexit. And 85 per cent of the time given to sort this out has already passed. As my mother repeatedly told me while I was cramming for exams, you can’t fatten the pig the night before the fair

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Why should US or Indian or Chinese monetary policy concern Ireland? So much of what we call ‘industrial policy’ here is really policy for US-based multinationals. Changes to the banking system in the US, and more importantly business conditions there, can signal either good or bad times for us.

Home economics: 'Ownership is everything'

Home economics: 'Ownership is everything'

Housing policy is always political, but it has created a deeply politicised group of people in the have-nots. These people are typically younger and poorer. They are sometimes called ‘millennials’, but I like to think of them as people who are nearly 40

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

There have never been more workers, and they have never paid more in tax than today. Household disposable incomes are higher now than they were during the boom, and there are proportionately fewer children as a percentage of the population to look after. Why, then, is there a child poverty problem in this country?

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Ideas matter. Memory matters. Without memory, the quality of our thinking deteriorates. We need to remember why the centre matters, how it has lifted living standards across every continent. Paschal Donohoe gave a speech last week arguing for a re-defined centre: socially engaged and based on action

Stephen Kinsella on the housing market

Stephen Kinsella on the housing market

The system we have set up is driving the negative outcomes we are seeing, where The Economist calculates house prices are 25 per cent overvalued, 10,000 people are homeless, and we can expect another boom/bust cycle in property to come

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Turkey’s economy got out of control because politicians, desperate to hold onto power, used the levers of power to purchase an electoral victory, and the economy overheated from an excess of credit. We know exactly what that feels like.

Kinsella on broadband

Kinsella on broadband

The state will end up carrying the can to roll out broadband to the furthest parts of the country. We must remember what the new public management scholars taught us to forget. The state is the only one who can do it, so the state should be the only one to do it

Stephen Kinsella on Banking culture

Stephen Kinsella on Banking culture

No doubt there are more scandals to come, largely consequence-free for the individuals found culpable. Banks, put simply, are crisis-generating institutions. No bank has been scandal-free. Trackers? They knew what they were doing. They did it anyway.

Kinsella on Brexit

Kinsella on Brexit

Brexit is bad for everyone. Even the Brexiteers. They know this. They don’t care. Ireland needs to become an intolerant minority within the EU. We need to start saying to everyone it’s not grand. It’s far from grand. And without a backstop, we are goosed

Where will workers be when the world changes?

Where will workers be when the world changes?

Unions must reinvent themselves in order to respond to the current technological, financial, and global revolutions