Saturday June 6, 2020

Numbers fail to add up for higher education in Ireland

Barry J Whyte

Chief Feature Writer

@whytebarry
20th October, 2019
A 2016 report argued that funding needed to increase by €600m in order to address staff-to-student ratios by 2021

Few disagree that the key issue in Irish third-level education is the drying-up of funding since the crash, writes Barry J Whyte.

John Walsh, a lecturer at Trinity College, as well as a representative for the Irish Federation of University Teachers union, said that the last decade had marked “the biggest withdrawal of public funding and resources from higher education since mass education was introduced in the 1950s”.

“State investment in higher education...

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