To try, buy and put by

25th November, 2018

All three wines today are examples of one of Italy’s greatest, but currently slightly unfashionable wines, Chianti. Years of overproduction after World War II by unambitious co-operatives and wineries led to the widespread undermining of Chianti’s reputation. Great producers tried to escape the sullied Chianti name by inventing the Supertuscan category. A few other producers like Selvapiana hung on and sought to impose higher standards, as they do here from their high-altitude, ancient Rufina-based vineyards....

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