Saturday December 7, 2019

Letter from the editor

It’s 30 years since the launch of The Sunday Business Post, and we’re marking the occasion with some important changes

22nd November, 2019

Dear readers,

This weekend, The Sunday Business Post celebrates its 30th anniversary. The first edition of the newspaper was published on November 26, 1989. It was billed then as “Ireland‘s financial, political and economic newspaper”, and it remains that today.

Since its launch, the newspaper has become a trusted brand and developed a loyal following. It has also adapted and changed while remaining a must-read.

Marking the past is important, but so is looking to the future. As editor, I committed recently to making ongoing improvements, and this Sunday we are implementing some significant changes.

The Sunday Business Post is changing to the Business Post. The printed newspaper will feature a more sophisticated design, and we are launching a new website and mobile app.

The changes are designed to improve the reader experience, whether you choose to read the paper in print or access it online. The new digital presence will allow us to begin to produce more quality journalism throughout the week, and make our subscription packages even better value.

The decision to change our name was not taken lightly, but is necessary to help us adapt to a changing media landscape. The Business Post is now part of a wider media group that includes an events company, a media services business and other ventures. The group also expanded recently by taking ownership of magazine titles including Irish Tatler and Food & Wine, in a move that will create new opportunities to improve our content.

The Business Post remains a Sunday publication in print, but we are also aiming to publish more digital-first journalism during the week to enhance our online product. The change in name reflects this increasing level of activity and our ambition to provide you, our readers, with more.

Here’s to the last 30 years. Onwards we go.

Richie Oakley

Editor

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