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When a secret affair opens up a heart of darkness

When a secret affair opens up a heart of darkness

While the hype around Louise O'Neill's novel is currently at fever pitch

Ambitious debut that’s well travelled but not worldly-wise

Ambitious debut that’s well travelled but not worldly-wise

Restless Souls is the debut of an ambitious writer who is sure to grow in interesting ways

Escaping a cloistered childhood to break free into the world

Escaping a cloistered childhood to break free into the world

Memoir: Educated, By Tara Westover, Hutchinson, €17.55

Suede frontman’s eloquent memoir recalls his pre-fame years

Suede frontman’s eloquent memoir recalls his pre-fame years

What we have here is not your typical rock star vanity memoir of the sex-‘n’-drugs-‘n’-rock-’n’-roll variety, but rather a poised and reflective view of a life not yet fully lived

Food for thought from a memoir of mental illness

Food for thought from a memoir of mental illness

A first-time author, who has written for the Times, the Daily Telegraph and the Spectator, among others, Laura Freeman has framed her debut as a story of how reading about food helped her conquer her fear of eating in real life

Why the US plunged into a dirty war without end

Why the US plunged into a dirty war without end

Steve Coll shows us how "America's secret wars" are shaped

Revenge fantasy gets bogged down in a Rabelaisian mire

Revenge fantasy gets bogged down in a Rabelaisian mire

There’s something disappointing about this “resistance” revenge fantasy, which too often feels like rebellion for rebellion’s sake

A craftsman captures the smallness of American life

A craftsman captures the smallness of American life

Russo's collection of three short stories and novella, while not always wrapping themselves up in satisfying conclusions, are still a pleasure to read.

Some timely advice on slowing down and switching off

Some timely advice on slowing down and switching off

Catherine Blyth’s On Time is a pithy attempt to understand time, why it always feels like it’s speeding up, and how we might try to reclaim it

Spot-on about inequality, if a bit short on answers

Spot-on about inequality, if a bit short on answers

While British Liberal Democrat MP Jo Swinson’s book provides clear-eyed analysis of the challenges facing women, its proposed remedies can seem trite

Footballing memoir scores on authenticity

Footballing memoir scores on authenticity

Sometimes the stories of those who strive for greatness and fall short can be just as compelling. Paul Ferris’s The Boy on the Shed is one of those stories

Working class hero

Working class hero

Willy Vlautin’s novels, which deal with people struggling through unfashionable, tough lives, have attracted praise from some of the best known writers of this generation, writes Nadine O’Regan

McGowan calls out the villains in movie memoir

McGowan calls out the villains in movie memoir

Rose McGowan doesn’t pull her punches, and sometimes the sheer scale of the madness of the world she describes serves to undermine rather than add weight to her strident perspective

Superb satire skewers pretensions of privileged Australians

Superb satire skewers pretensions of privileged Australians

Educated, comfortable Sydney dwellers are devastatingly pilloried as having become morally unmoored by cosy privilege in Michelle de Kretser’s fifth novel

Disturbing story of Norwegian sisters who joined Isis

Disturbing story of Norwegian sisters who joined Isis

Non-fiction: Two Sisters: Into the Syrian Jihad, By Åsne Seierstad, translated by Seán Kinsella, Virago, €17.25