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How not to be perfect

How not to be perfect

Emilie Pine is a lecturer in modern drama at University College Dublin. She’s also a new voice from the Tramp Press publishing stable. Here, in an exclusive feature, she writes on her workaholic epiphany

Escaping life’s harsh realities through the creative process

Escaping life’s harsh realities through the creative process

Theroux’s enthusiasm brings his readers on many exciting adventures

Theroux’s enthusiasm brings his readers on many exciting adventures

De Bernières veers away from sentimentality and into tragedy

De Bernières veers away from sentimentality and into tragedy

A down-to-earth exploration of the extraordinary

A down-to-earth exploration of the extraordinary

Fallen women stripped bare makes for uneasy reading

Fallen women stripped bare makes for uneasy reading

Illuminating the shadow side of the Chinese Century

Illuminating the shadow side of the Chinese Century

A preposterously presidential yarn that packs a fair punch

A preposterously presidential yarn that packs a fair punch

Compelling tale of a family at the mercy of official Ireland

Compelling tale of a family at the mercy of official Ireland

How nuclear obsessions changed all of our futures

How nuclear obsessions changed all of our futures

A compelling exploration of race in modern America

A compelling exploration of race in modern America

A deeply compelling collection

Communications: A call for a mass social media switch-off

Communications: A call for a mass social media switch-off

Ten Arguments For Deleting Your Social Media Accounts Right Now

Tom and Molly Martens: Trying and failing to spot the monsters in one’s midst

Tom and Molly Martens: Trying and failing to spot the monsters in one’s midst

Where do they come from, these normal monsters? And how do we spot them, before it’s too late?

Futuristic fable is a fine idea badly done

Futuristic fable is a fine idea badly done

The Biggerers is a fine idea, poorly executed. For the disorientating first 72 pages, it’s hard to figure out exactly what’s going on

Dark stories that don’t let the reader relax

Dark stories that don’t let the reader relax

Mia Gallagher’s prose spans genres as well as decades: there is realism and surrealism, there are love stories, ghost stories and those stories which fit – poignantly, disturbingly – in-between