Books, Magazine /

Revealing the sixth

Revealing the sixth

Though we navigate life through our phones, we humans are hard-wired to relate to nature - we’ve just forgotten how to do it. In his new book Wild Signs and Star Paths: The Keys to Our Lost Sixth Sense, ‘Natural Navigator’ Tristan Gooley reveals how everyone can tap back into this ability and enjoy the outdoors in an exciting way - one which is both new and ancient. In this extract from his book, he suggests how we can begin to tune back into our relationship with nature, starting today

Debutant novelist fully indulges her sentimental side

Debutant novelist fully indulges her sentimental side

Your humble reviewer found Helen Cullen’s The Lost Letters of William Woolf a pretty sentimental sort of book, and it wasn’t entirely to his taste. Which isn’t to say that it’s a bad book

Fear and navel-gazing on the campaign trail

Fear and navel-gazing on the campaign trail

Instead of writing about Clinton, Amy Chozick turns the focus of Chasing Hillary on herself. And in doing so, she ignores a basic rule of journalism at her peril

What a carve-up: A professor of anatomy shares her grisly yarns

What a carve-up: A professor of anatomy shares her grisly yarns

Forensic anthropologist and anatomy professor Sue Black is a surprisingly chipper soul, as she displays in her new memoir

Feminist memoir deploys symbolism to blur the life lines

Feminist memoir deploys symbolism to blur the life lines

A compact volume of 186 pages, The Cost of Living spills over with ideas, observation and interrogation

Critical mass: A triumph for a literary gamekeeper turned poacher

Critical mass: A triumph for a literary gamekeeper turned poacher

Upstate is a thrillingly good book: moving, funny and superbly intelligent, it compresses a wealth of perception into its 233 immaculately crafted pages

New York story mixes bleakness with verve

New York story mixes bleakness with verve

There are more killer one-liners in Jade Sharma's Problems than in most comedy festivals, including a note-perfect dissection of the legions of struggling artists in New York

The literary side of summer

The literary side of summer

We’ve had the mother of all winters so we deserve a little summer in our lives. And with summer holidays come lazy days at the beach and a chance to put your feet up and read, read, read

Donald Maclean: The spy who came in from the East

Donald Maclean: The spy who came in from the East

Roland Philipps unravels this story with skill and suspense

Bibi: A ‘man of destiny’ whose legacy is a fractured Israel

Bibi: A ‘man of destiny’ whose legacy is a fractured Israel

Benjamin Netanyahu's ultimate legacy will not be a more secure nation, but a deeply fractured Israeli society living behind walls

Sittenfeld grows in stature with skilful short stories

Sittenfeld grows in stature with skilful short stories

Curtis Sittenfeld has always written brilliantly about young adulthood, and her characters are often wrestling with the remnants of their younger selves

Nesbo’s Macbeth is a relentless mire of murder

Nesbo’s Macbeth is a relentless mire of murder

Taking place in a fictional unnamed 'town without sun' around the year 1970, Nesbo’s setting is grimmer than a month of Sundays in the Siberian midlands

Searching for some good cheer in the London of the Blitz

Searching for some good cheer in the London of the Blitz

AJ Pearce is a natural storyteller with a light and witty touch, and the book is at its best when it embraces absurdity

Comey is revealed as the author of his own downfall

Comey is revealed as the author of his own downfall

There’s very little about the book’s main selling point – Comey’s battle with Trump – that we don’t already know

Anatomy of a national tragedy waiting to happen

Anatomy of a national tragedy waiting to happen

For Irish conspiracy theorists, few subjects have provided more fertile ground than the killing of Michael Collins at Béal na Bláth on August 22, 1922