Saturday February 22, 2020

Good Bits

The cultivation of fast-growing trees, such as poplar, willow and eucalyptus, as cleaner-burning biofuels may actually contribute to air pollution.

13th January, 2013
Trees planted on large biofuel plantations have been found to release isoprene which, when mixed with other pollutants, creates ozone that can affect crop yields (above) and local human health.

Biofuel backlash

The cultivation of fast-growing trees, such as poplar, willow and eucalyptus, as cleaner-burning biofuels may actually contribute to air pollution, according to a new study published in the journal, Nature Climate Change (nature.com). Trees planted on large biofuel plantations have been found to release isoprene which, when mixed with other pollutants, creates ozone that can affect crop yields (above) and local human health.

According to Nick Hewitt of Lancaster University, the best...

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