Stephen Kinsella: For IMF, sorry seems to be the easiest word

A leaked transcript of a recent phone call between two IMF bigwigs has laid bare the divisions within the Troika

3rd April, 2016
IMF Headquarters in Washington, DC Picture: Getty

Every few years the International Monetary Fund publishes a mea culpa, examining its failures to implement reforms across the globe. Each of the IMF’s “ex post evaluations” is the equivalent of the parade of apologies that Ireland’s bankers and regulators treated us to during our own banking inquiry. Perhaps the apologies were well meant, but as they carried no consequences for those apologising, they sort of fall flat.

Remember...

Subscribe from just €1 for the first month!

Currency

What's Included

With any subscription you will have access to

  • 971569B3-2C5E-4C45-B798-CEADE16987A8

    Unlimited multi-device access to our iPad, iPhone and Android Apps

  • 099C8662-C57C-42F2-9426-F2F90DF17C8F

    Unlimited access to our eReader library

  • 198AE43B-B9CF-4892-8769-D63C2104BA08

    Exclusive daily insight and opinion seven days a week

  • D8F37B78-25E4-4E4A-A376-4F5789B1564A

    Create alerts to never miss a subject that matters to you

  • B15F2521-37CD-4E02-B898-730A20D39F7F

    Get access to exclusive offers for subscribers on gifts and experiences

  • A564FE02-1AB8-4579-AF9D-BA32A2E5ACA7

    Get content from Business Post, Business Post Magazines, Connected, Tatler and Food & Wine

Share this post

Related Stories

Private rental sector remains strong despite Covid-19

How the programme for government will shape housing

Insight Niall Byrne 1 year ago

Comment: US must defuse Covid-19’s ticking time bomb of debt

Comment: The recovery will be more U than V-shaped

Insight Larry Hatheway 1 year ago