David McWilliams: There will be a hard Brexit

An anti-immigrant Britain operating an economic and social policy will look and feel like the 1970s

9th October, 2016

I’m sitting opposite the “Spitfire” Meeting Room in Southampton airport. The echoes of “their finest hour” are everywhere on the south coast of England, not surprisingly. Southampton, one of the main ports for British trade with Europe, voted overwhelmingly for Brexit, proving that there’s no end to the self-harm that certain parts of England will endure in the name of sovereignty.

But sovereignty is what it’s all...

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