Government plans to spend €80.1bn next year

The government’s summer economic statement shows that the next budget in October is going to be another big-spending one to counter the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic.

14th July, 2021
Government plans to spend €80.1bn next year
Paschal Donohoe, the Finance Minister, and Michael McGrath, the Public Expenditure Minister, have signalled their intention to bring borrowing under control

Paschal Donohoe and Michael McGrath have signalled their intention to bring borrowing back under control – but not just yet.

Their summer economic statement shows that the next budget in October is going to be another big-spending one to counter the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Both ministers have stated that spending will increase by a further 5.5 per cent next year, bringing the overall budget to €80.1 billion. And that spending could potentially increase...

Subscribe from just €1 for the first month!

Currency

What's Included

With any subscription you will have access to

  • 971569B3-2C5E-4C45-B798-CEADE16987A8

    Unlimited multi-device access to our iPad, iPhone and Android Apps

  • 099C8662-C57C-42F2-9426-F2F90DF17C8F

    Unlimited access to our eReader library

  • 198AE43B-B9CF-4892-8769-D63C2104BA08

    Exclusive daily insight and opinion seven days a week

  • D8F37B78-25E4-4E4A-A376-4F5789B1564A

    Create alerts to never miss a subject that matters to you

  • B15F2521-37CD-4E02-B898-730A20D39F7F

    Get access to exclusive offers for subscribers on gifts and experiences

  • A564FE02-1AB8-4579-AF9D-BA32A2E5ACA7

    Get content from Business Post, Business Post Magazines, Connected, Tatler and Food & Wine

Related Stories

Donohoe: long-term spending commitments need to match sustainable revenues

Labour shortage to hit global recovery, says top economist

Economics Lorcan Allen 2 weeks ago

Aidan Regan: We need our allies more than we need our beloved 12.5 per cent tax rate

Economics Aidan Regan 2 weeks ago

Comment: Global economy heading for stagflationary debt crisis