Thursday August 6, 2020

Sweden proves that countries can be wealthy and clean too

Sweden began to separate carbon emissions from growth in the 1970s, with dramatic results

5th July, 2020
One of the most dramatic effects of a consistently high carbon tax in Sweden over three decades has been the behavioural changes it has fostered. Picture: Getty

Given a choice, would you prefer to live in a wealthy, high-emissions country, or in one with low emissions because it is poor? This is the false binary activists are often confronted with when serious climate action is being contemplated.

You will hear much about the “carnage and human misery” that would inevitably ensue were green policies to ever be implemented in Ireland. This reflects a narrative that runs something like this: “Yes, while of...

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