Saturday September 19, 2020

Macron cannot afford to back down on pensions

Civil unrest is besieging French society, but the president has plenty of reasons to stay the course when it comes to his much-criticised pension reforms

5th February, 2020
The more radical unions see the pensions fight as part of a broader ideological struggle against economic neoliberalism

A year after a proposed fuel tax triggered the gilets jaunes protests, France faces another crisis, this time over pension reform. Mass demonstrations have now gone on for more than 50 days, not letting up even for Christmas and New Year’s Eve. Strikes have disrupted the operations of both the French National Railway Company (SNCF) and the RATP bus and subway network, leading to more than €1 billion ($1.1 billion) in losses for those companies....

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