Sunday February 16, 2020

Macron cannot afford to back down on pensions

Civil unrest is besieging French society, but the president has plenty of reasons to stay the course when it comes to his much-criticised pension reforms

5th February, 2020
The more radical unions see the pensions fight as part of a broader ideological struggle against economic neoliberalism

A year after a proposed fuel tax triggered the gilets jaunes protests, France faces another crisis, this time over pension reform. Mass demonstrations have now gone on for more than 50 days, not letting up even for Christmas and New Year’s Eve. Strikes have disrupted the operations of both the French National Railway Company (SNCF) and the RATP bus and subway network, leading to more than €1 billion ($1.1 billion) in losses for those companies....

Subscribe from just €1 for the first month!

Exclusive offers:

All Digital Access + eReader

Trial

€1

Unlimited Access for 1 Month

Then €19.99 a month after the offer period.

Get basic
*New subscribers only
You can cancel any time.

Annual

€200

€149 For the 1st Year

Unlimited Access for 1 Year

You can cancel any time.

Quarterly

€55

€42

90 Day Pass

You can cancel any time.

Team Pass

Get a Business Account for you and your team

Related Stories

Ireland’s economic growth model is politically unsustainable with the foreign direct investment regime creating a dynamic of winners and losers

Aidan Regan | 19 hours ago

The next government faces some big fiscal choices, but it remains to be seen if the ground will shift left

Brian Keegan | 19 hours ago

The party claims it is the victim of bias, but negative coverage is not confined to one political faction

Eoin O’Malley | 19 hours ago