Coronavirus in Ireland: hope for the best and plan for the worst

There are no cases here so far, but it’s important for businesses to have a detailed contingency plan in place in case staff contract the novel coronoavirus, which has infected up to 20 per cent of the population in China

9th February, 2020
Coronavirus in Ireland: hope for the best and plan for the worst
A Chinese police officer wearing a protective mask: we must also plan for an outbreak here to prevent panic later Picture: Getty

The disruption and distress resulting from the outbreak of novel coronavirus in China is unprecedented. Governments, health agencies and businesses across the world have decisions to make now about how best to plan for a potential outbreak in an unpredictable situation.

There are three possible scenarios for Ireland.

In the best-case scenario, Ireland might expect about 50-200 suspected cases of the Wuhan coronavirus. These cases would all be promptly detected and isolated with airborne precautions....

Subscribe from just €1 for the first month!

Currency

What's Included

With any subscription you will have access to

  • 971569B3-2C5E-4C45-B798-CEADE16987A8

    Unlimited multi-device access to our iPad, iPhone and Android Apps

  • 099C8662-C57C-42F2-9426-F2F90DF17C8F

    Unlimited access to our eReader library

  • 198AE43B-B9CF-4892-8769-D63C2104BA08

    Exclusive daily insight and opinion seven days a week

  • D8F37B78-25E4-4E4A-A376-4F5789B1564A

    Create alerts to never miss a subject that matters to you

  • B15F2521-37CD-4E02-B898-730A20D39F7F

    Get access to exclusive offers for subscribers on gifts and experiences

  • A564FE02-1AB8-4579-AF9D-BA32A2E5ACA7

    Get content from Business Post, Business Post Magazines, Connected, Tatler and Food & Wine

Share this post

Related Stories

Nadine O’Regan: The Gates announce divorce and we’re utterly gobsmacked

Emer McLysaght: My pandemic purchases, part 786,423: roller skates

Emer McLysaght: Getting down and dirty with outdoor living

Nadine O’Regan: How we learned to languish