Stephen Kinsella, Business /

Let’s get with the health spending programme

Let’s get with the health spending programme

Despite having a younger population than most high-income countries, we spend far more per person on health than the OECD average. And our health system is still a mess. We need to start looking hard at where exactly the money is going, or costs will just keep rising

Stephen Kinsella on policy response

Stephen Kinsella on policy response

The second policy response to fast-paced changes in the nature of work and its attendant rise in earnings inequality is to set up a universal basic income programme. This is money everyone gets transferred into their bank account every month, regardless of their age or income level. Think of it as child benefit, but for everyone.

Shadow banks: Dodgy dealers or misunderstood innovators?

Shadow banks: Dodgy dealers or misunderstood innovators?

Firms all over Dublin administer parts of the global shadow banking system, but it is the Irish Central Bank which has built up the first fully formed picture of this world. Others now need to share what they know about this intriguing arm of the financial system

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Unless we have good data and good oversight of the shadow banks operating in Ireland, where they come from and what they’re here for, we cannot understand the likely consequences for us when they hit good or bad times

Government must support diversification of enterprise

Government must support diversification of enterprise

The national finances are once again becoming heavily dependent on one narrow, highly profitable sector of the economy. Sound familiar?

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Faced with a massive accumulated deficit in housing, health and education, the only tools we have available to us are fiscal policy and luck. We know from the past that luck eventually runs out.

What the state is doing right: part four

What the state is doing right: part four

Today, I want to finish my series on what the state gets right by looking at the state’s response to Brexit since 2015. Yes, you read that correctly: 2015. I also want to reflect on what the state is doing to get us ready for the future.

What the state is doing right: part three

What the state is doing right: part three

From running our libraries to helping vulnerable children, to buying things in a smart way, to using technology to get us new passports and new services, to helping guide policy, the state is doing more for us than any of us know.

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Why should US or Indian or Chinese monetary policy concern Ireland? So much of what we call ‘industrial policy’ here is really policy for US-based multinationals. Changes to the banking system in the US, and more importantly business conditions there, can signal either good or bad times for us.

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

There have never been more workers, and they have never paid more in tax than today. Household disposable incomes are higher now than they were during the boom, and there are proportionately fewer children as a percentage of the population to look after. Why, then, is there a child poverty problem in this country?

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Ideas matter. Memory matters. Without memory, the quality of our thinking deteriorates. We need to remember why the centre matters, how it has lifted living standards across every continent. Paschal Donohoe gave a speech last week arguing for a re-defined centre: socially engaged and based on action

Stephen Kinsella on the housing market

Stephen Kinsella on the housing market

The system we have set up is driving the negative outcomes we are seeing, where The Economist calculates house prices are 25 per cent overvalued, 10,000 people are homeless, and we can expect another boom/bust cycle in property to come

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Turkey’s economy got out of control because politicians, desperate to hold onto power, used the levers of power to purchase an electoral victory, and the economy overheated from an excess of credit. We know exactly what that feels like.

Kinsella on broadband

Kinsella on broadband

The state will end up carrying the can to roll out broadband to the furthest parts of the country. We must remember what the new public management scholars taught us to forget. The state is the only one who can do it, so the state should be the only one to do it

Stephen Kinsella on Banking culture

Stephen Kinsella on Banking culture

No doubt there are more scandals to come, largely consequence-free for the individuals found culpable. Banks, put simply, are crisis-generating institutions. No bank has been scandal-free. Trackers? They knew what they were doing. They did it anyway.