Stephen Kinsella

Stephen Kinsella

Articles by Stephen Kinsella

Stephen Kinsella on economics

Stephen Kinsella on economics

Charities do good work, but given the sensitive work they do, and the funding they receive, as organisations they deserve our scrutiny

Stephen Kinsella on Immigration

Stephen Kinsella on Immigration

Ireland is by far the most successful country in the EU at integrating migrants, and it’s vital that debate on the issue is not allowed to descend into emotional soundbites.

We can see the positive side of Brexit . . . in all its negatives

We can see the positive side of Brexit . . . in all its negatives

The EU has shown extraordinary patience, and we’re lucky to be part of this club

Ireland's second-tier cities need to grow faster

Ireland's second-tier cities need to grow faster

Ireland is a bit odd in terms of the distribution of its population. Our urban hierarchy is odd not because Dublin is so big, but because our other cities are so small

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

Stephen Kinsella on Economics

The reality is that if international trade and dealings are not governed by some set of rules, then size is all that matters. A world like that is very dangerous for just under five million people living on an island on the western edge of Europe.

The Action Plan for Jobs has to rank as one of the most successful policy programmes in the history of the state.But its replacement, FutureJobs Ireland, is a much more ambitious strategy.

The Action Plan for Jobs has to rank as one of the most successful policy programmes in the history of the state.But its replacement, FutureJobs Ireland, is a much more ambitious strategy.

Jobs, jobs, jobs. But what kinds of jobs? Ireland is at, or near, the top of an economic cycle. C...

The two 'national questions' we must answer

The two 'national questions' we must answer

It is only in reading the 1921 Dáil Treaty debates that it becomes clear how similar Michael Collins’s position was to the one Theresa May is in today.

Will business bin Brexit? Or is it Brexit forever?

Will business bin Brexit? Or is it Brexit forever?

People need jobs, certainty and a settlement which allows them to prosper. But despite more than two years spent negotiating with the EU, a deal seems further away than ever

Stephen Kinsella on health spending

Stephen Kinsella on health spending

Our system is geographically unequal. Where you are born really matters. Our outcomes from our health system are measurably worse than in other countries, and our spending per person is as high as Denmark’s. Why is that?

Let’s get with the health spending programme

Let’s get with the health spending programme

Despite having a younger population than most high-income countries, we spend far more per person on health than the OECD average. And our health system is still a mess. We need to start looking hard at where exactly the money is going, or costs will just keep rising

Solving Ireland's productivity problem

Solving Ireland's productivity problem

What determines an economy’s prosperity is its productivity: how the workers and firms in the economy use their knowledge and skills to make things or deliver services people want

Stephen Kinsella on policy response

Stephen Kinsella on policy response

The second policy response to fast-paced changes in the nature of work and its attendant rise in earnings inequality is to set up a universal basic income programme. This is money everyone gets transferred into their bank account every month, regardless of their age or income level. Think of it as child benefit, but for everyone.

We must get ready for robots

We must get ready for robots

Globotics, the combination of globalisation and robotics, is on the horizon and Ireland must prepare now

We’re getting close to the stage where the fate of our country could end up being decided by a set of Dungeons and Dragons dice. This explains the EU’s seeming intransigence over its negotiated position, and May’s robotic talking points in parliament last Wednesday. Neither party can deviate very far from the edge of the cliff, because to do so would be ridiculous

We’re getting close to the stage where the fate of our country could end up being decided by a set of Dungeons and Dragons dice. This explains the EU’s seeming intransigence over its negotiated position, and May’s robotic talking points in parliament last Wednesday. Neither party can deviate very far from the edge of the cliff, because to do so would be ridiculous

Blame it on a post-colonial fantasy, but there’s nothing imaginary about the damage Brexit will do to Britain, and to us

Shadow banks: Dodgy dealers or misunderstood innovators?

Shadow banks: Dodgy dealers or misunderstood innovators?

Firms all over Dublin administer parts of the global shadow banking system, but it is the Irish Central Bank which has built up the first fully formed picture of this world. Others now need to share what they know about this intriguing arm of the financial system