Róisín Kiberd

Róisín Kiberd

A knowing meditation on creativity and its potential to destroy

A knowing meditation on creativity and its potential to destroy

William Wall's fifth novel Grace’s Day serves, ultimately, as a strong and knowing meditation on the tyranny of writers

Building a brighter future

Building a brighter future

Róisín Kiberd speaks to Shane Dempsey of the CIF on their upcoming conference and how the construction industry will play a central role in shaping the future of Ireland

Grappling with guilt as feminism comes to a crucial crossroads

Grappling with guilt as feminism comes to a crucial crossroads

Non-Fiction: The Guilty Feminist, By Deborah Frances-White, Virago, €17.95 In the introduction ...

Invoking the spirit of 1985 in a skittishly grotesque novel

Invoking the spirit of 1985 in a skittishly grotesque novel

Fiction: Heartbreaker, By Claudia Dey The Borough Press, €16.66 An early scene in Heartbreaker,...

A little more action

A little more action

For all the greenness of its premise, sustainability remains something of a grey area in tech, writes Róisín Kiberd

Why upskilling is a process and not a destination

Why upskilling is a process and not a destination

Róisín Kiberd on the need to keep upskilling as the speed of development accelerates

A memoir of pain, and of how to surgically save a life

A memoir of pain, and of how to surgically save a life

Written by Professor Jim McCaul, a consultant surgeon at Glasgow’s Queen Elizabeth University Hospital and one of Britain’s leading maxillofacial surgeons, Face to Face records some of his most challenging operations

Tyler still capturing the quiet heroism of ordinary Americans

Tyler still capturing the quiet heroism of ordinary Americans

Hiding within Clock Dance’s unchallenging story of intergenerational camaraderie, there’s a far weightier question: that of finding purpose in life

Small-town Irish romance with a gothic tinge

Small-town Irish romance with a gothic tinge

It’s only in the novel’s eventful second half that one comes to appreciate Rebecca O’Connor’s precision, her ability to condense a series of tragedies and life-altering moments into a deceptively simple narrative

Taking artistic angst to its logical and lonely conclusion

Taking artistic angst to its logical and lonely conclusion

While Louisa Young’s writing is wise, witty and beautifully perceptive on love and the forces which drive loved ones apart, a number of questions loom throughout You Left Early’s 407 pages

De Bernières veers away from sentimentality and into tragedy

De Bernières veers away from sentimentality and into tragedy

FICTION: So Much Life Left Over, By Louis de Bernières , Harvill Secker/Vintage, €16.10 So Muc...

Fallen women stripped bare makes for uneasy reading

Fallen women stripped bare makes for uneasy reading

FICTION: The Mars Room, Rachel Kushner, Jonathan Cape, €19.55 The Mars Room is the name of a fi...

The great untethering

The great untethering

Mobile devices have revolutionised the workplace, but what are the risks, asks Róisín Kiberd

Live at The Witch Trials

Live at The Witch Trials

Jesse Jones’s powerful, unsettling new exhibition puts the spotlight on female resistance - and reminds us that more change is needed, writes Róisín Kiberd

Plenty to digest at agri-food summit

Plenty to digest at agri-food summit

Celebrity diets, Brexit and the power of health lobbyists made for a meaty agenda at Croke Park for the 2018 National Food and Drink Industry Summit, writes Róisín Kiberd