Nadine O’Regan

Nadine O’Regan

Nadine O'Regan is Books and Arts Editor with The Sunday Business Post. Raised in Skibbereen, Co. Cork, she joined the paper as a freelancer contributor in 2000, after graduating with an M.Phil in Creative Writing from Trinity College Dublin. O'Regan has worked for publications including The Irish Times, The Irish Independent, Hot Press and Spin magazine (US), and served as a reporter for RTE's arts television programme The Works. A regular contributor to TV and radio shows, she also presents the Sunday evening programme Songs in the Key of Life on Irish radio station Today FM.

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The past is never past, not when the internet is around to remind us of it. And it makes our present more dangerous than we might like to imagine

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Facebook is in the dock for allowing nefarious third-parties to get their hands on our personal information. But who handed it over in the first place? And for the silliest of reasons

The Ryan line: Author Donal Ryan is not on easy street

The Ryan line: Author Donal Ryan is not on easy street

Ryan’s meteoric rise as a novelist has brought him awards and plaudits - but also considerable envy and snobbish backbiting

Author Donal Ryan vents at Leo Varadkar

Author Donal Ryan vents at Leo Varadkar

Taoiseach derided as ‘Fr Trendy’

Altan: Dreams and songs to sing

Altan: Dreams and songs to sing

With their new album The Gap of Dreams, Mairéad Ní Mhaonaigh and Altan have tapped into a seam of creativity inspired by their bygone musical idols to create something that is still very much in the here and now

Tara Westover on the human cost of leaving home

Tara Westover on the human cost of leaving home

Born into a survivalist Mormon family, author Tara Westover escaped her tough and often brutal childhood through education

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Do we have to endure forever the old cliches around relationships – or is it possible that a diet of love isn’t just for women?

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Let’s face it: it doesn’t pay to be nice all the time. The sooner we learn the art of confrontation, the sooner we’ll start getting what we want out of life

Art in the blood: Ellen Quinn Banville and Finola Cahill

Art in the blood: Ellen Quinn Banville and Finola Cahill

If you think you recognise the surname, you’re right: singer Ellen Quinn Banville does indeed have a world-famous novelist father and an arts producer mother. She’s one half of Paris-based musical duo Pembroke, with Finola Cahill, and their debut album At Sea is making waves as a word-of-mouth success

Profile of The Rolling Stones: Still Rolling in it

Profile of The Rolling Stones: Still Rolling in it

The Rolling Stones are elder statesmen of rock ‘n roll now – all of them are in their seventies – but the brand that sustains them remains an enticing one to an Irish public who have lived with the band since their formation in 1962

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The new series of Room To Improve has made one thing clear: it’s Dermot Bannon’s world, and we’re all just living in it

Renaissance man: David Kitt on the future of music

Renaissance man: David Kitt on the future of music

Singer-songwriter David Kitt was the most prominent of a troupe of young Irish troubadours who found fame in the early 2000s. But he hasn’t given up hope of having another moment in the sun with his fine new album

Working class hero

Working class hero

Willy Vlautin’s novels, which deal with people struggling through unfashionable, tough lives, have attracted praise from some of the best known writers of this generation, writes Nadine O’Regan

Irish theatre: The next stage

Irish theatre: The next stage

As the old, and in some cases discredited, guard exits stage left, it’s time for a new generation to redefine theatre’s relationship with modern Ireland

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It’s official: stuffing our faces with sugar-infused fast food and treats is not what makes us fat. The causes are in fact having the wrong friends, taking antibiotics and wearing wax raincoats