Nadine O’Regan

Nadine O’Regan

Nadine O'Regan is Books and Arts Editor with The Sunday Business Post. Raised in Skibbereen, Co. Cork, she joined the paper as a freelancer contributor in 2000, after graduating with an M.Phil in Creative Writing from Trinity College Dublin. O'Regan has worked for publications including The Irish Times, The Irish Independent, Hot Press and Spin magazine (US), and served as a reporter for RTE's arts television programme The Works. A regular contributor to TV and radio shows, she also presents the Sunday evening programme Songs in the Key of Life on Irish radio station Today FM.

Art in the blood: Ellen Quinn Banville and Finola Cahill

Art in the blood: Ellen Quinn Banville and Finola Cahill

If you think you recognise the surname, you’re right: singer Ellen Quinn Banville does indeed have a world-famous novelist father and an arts producer mother. She’s one half of Paris-based musical duo Pembroke, with Finola Cahill, and their debut album At Sea is making waves as a word-of-mouth success

Profile of The Rolling Stones: Still Rolling in it

Profile of The Rolling Stones: Still Rolling in it

The Rolling Stones are elder statesmen of rock ‘n roll now – all of them are in their seventies – but the brand that sustains them remains an enticing one to an Irish public who have lived with the band since their formation in 1962

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The new series of Room To Improve has made one thing clear: it’s Dermot Bannon’s world, and we’re all just living in it

Renaissance man: David Kitt on the future of music

Renaissance man: David Kitt on the future of music

Singer-songwriter David Kitt was the most prominent of a troupe of young Irish troubadours who found fame in the early 2000s. But he hasn’t given up hope of having another moment in the sun with his fine new album

Working class hero

Working class hero

Willy Vlautin’s novels, which deal with people struggling through unfashionable, tough lives, have attracted praise from some of the best known writers of this generation, writes Nadine O’Regan

Irish theatre: The next stage

Irish theatre: The next stage

As the old, and in some cases discredited, guard exits stage left, it’s time for a new generation to redefine theatre’s relationship with modern Ireland

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It’s official: stuffing our faces with sugar-infused fast food and treats is not what makes us fat. The causes are in fact having the wrong friends, taking antibiotics and wearing wax raincoats

Stage show Riot a hit abroad

Stage show Riot a hit abroad

Close to 13,000 people in Australia and the US have now seen the show, which features acrobatics, spoken word and slapstick comedy from performers including Panti Bliss and author Emmet Kirwan

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We’ve legalised divorce, so why is our relationship with it still so awkward? And why do we punish couples who don’t succeed at love by making them wait four years to legally split?

McGowan calls out the villains in movie memoir

McGowan calls out the villains in movie memoir

Rose McGowan doesn’t pull her punches, and sometimes the sheer scale of the madness of the world she describes serves to undermine rather than add weight to her strident perspective

‘I was the only female  on the bill for ten years’

‘I was the only female on the bill for ten years’

How do you find the time to scoop an Ifta nomination and host the awards show while competing in Dancing With The Stars? By being Deirdre O’Kane, writes Nadine O’Regan

Teenage kicks: The creator of Derry Girls

Teenage kicks: The creator of Derry Girls

The Channel 4 comedy Derry Girls is TV’s first runaway hit of 2018. Nadine O’Regan talked to its writer-creator Lisa McGee who, although now based in London, grew up in Derry in the 1990s

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Who are the new priests in our society? They’re our writers, our therapists, or maybe even the stranger on the train

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The demise of the Presidents Club is a clear sign that it’s no longer socially acceptable to behave like a swine to women

John Spillane is playing his cards right

John Spillane is playing his cards right

Spillane has achieved the unusual distinction of becoming the face of the public transport Leap card in his native Cork