Nadine O’Regan

Nadine O’Regan

Nadine O'Regan is Books and Arts Editor with The Sunday Business Post. Raised in Skibbereen, Co. Cork, she joined the paper as a freelancer contributor in 2000, after graduating with an M.Phil in Creative Writing from Trinity College Dublin. O'Regan has worked for publications including The Irish Times, The Irish Independent, Hot Press and Spin magazine (US), and served as a reporter for RTE's arts television programme The Works. A regular contributor to TV and radio shows, she also presents the Sunday evening programme Songs in the Key of Life on Irish radio station Today FM.

Artistic License: Boyle must beware the deadly sting of fame

Artistic License: Boyle must beware the deadly sting of fame

Well, it didn’t take long for the rot to set in. Overjoyed as the world has been for the past two minutes by Britain’s Got Talent singer Susan Boyle’s success; by her less-than-good looks and surprisingly beautiful voice, the feeling of wellbeing - a

Working-class hero

Working-class hero

Rather than stunt his professional development, Eran Creevy’s tough, council estate upbringing has honed his writing and directing talent, lending his debut film a realistic edge

First person

First person

Cormac Neeson: 27, rock singer, Belfast

Artistic License: Artists’ altered states

Artistic License: Artists’ altered states

What is it about alter egos these days? One minute, every artist in town is happy just to be themselves, promoting their album and hoping that they make the big time.

Scribbler: Soaking up the sound of silence on safari

Scribbler: Soaking up the sound of silence on safari

Right about the time you read this, I will be atop an elephant in the middle of the Okavango Delta in Botswana, hoping that lions aren’t capable of bringing down elephants - and that elephants aren’t interested in, em, throwing you to the lions.

The rise of Rose

The rise of Rose

An understated elegance and serene acting style have helped Australian Rose Byrne to make the difficult transition from television to the silver screen

Picking up the pieces

Picking up the pieces

James Frey was left bereft when his controversial fictionalised memoir was condemned by the literary world. Now he’s back with a novel, Bright Shiny Morning, that has defied his detractors’ expectations.

Artistic License: In praise of anonymity

Artistic License: In praise of anonymity

A celebrity poll last year revealed that the celebrities most people would hate to live next door to included Joe the Plumber, comedian Rosie O’Donnell, Lindsay Lohan and - topping the list - Britney Spears.

Artistic Licence: From poverty to poetry

Artistic Licence: From poverty to poetry

How will recession affect the arts? So far, predictions have ranged from the dire to the despair-inducing.

Well-heeled Living it up in Limerick

Well-heeled Living it up in Limerick

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Archer strikes again

Archer strikes again

Bestselling author, convicted perjurer, lifelong British peer, confidant to those in the highest offices of power – Jeffrey Archer has lived an extraordinary life but, as he prepares for the release of his 15th novel, it’s not the past, or his enemie

Artistic License: Old rockers out of tune

Artistic License: Old rockers out of tune

There are some celebrities whose sexuality I don’t want to think about. Gerry Ryan is one of those people. Bono is another. There are plenty of things wrong with U2’s badly-judged first single, Get On Your Boots, from their endlessly-hyped new album

Artistic License

Artistic License

DVD killed the video star

Scribbler: King’s Twilight fear

Scribbler: King’s Twilight fear

Horror writer Stephen King recently decided to take a potshot at an author who is outselling almost everyone else these days, Twilight writer Stephenie Meyer. King, the author of books such as Carrie and Misery, rubbished the 35-year-old author who h

Artistic License: The burden of Twitter

Artistic License: The burden of Twitter

Through the course of my work as a weekend radio presenter, I regularly get the chance to embarrass myself on the streets of Dublin by going up to random punters, Lucy Kennedy-style, and asking them questions about an arts or culture subject that we’