Nadine O’Regan

Nadine O’Regan

Nadine O'Regan is Books and Arts Editor with The Sunday Business Post. Raised in Skibbereen, Co. Cork, she joined the paper as a freelancer contributor in 2000, after graduating with an M.Phil in Creative Writing from Trinity College Dublin. O'Regan has worked for publications including The Irish Times, The Irish Independent, Hot Press and Spin magazine (US), and served as a reporter for RTE's arts television programme The Works. A regular contributor to TV and radio shows, she also presents the Sunday evening programme Songs in the Key of Life on Irish radio station Today FM.

Artistic licence: Let sleeping blogs lie

Artistic licence: Let sleeping blogs lie

You’ll find them all over the web: sad little notes flashing up on your computer screen like crosses marking a new kind of grave. The notes will generally employ similar phrases, lines like: ‘‘for reasons of time’’; ‘‘want to do other things’’; ‘‘nee

Artistic licence: Prestige confined to past

Artistic licence: Prestige confined to past

Half way through music writer David Browne’s fascinating new book on Sonic Youth, Goodbye 20th Century, he tells a story that neatly illustrates just how much the music industry has changed over the past two decades.

Eastern premise

Eastern premise

Jhumpa Lahiri’s subtle brand of storytelling, merging the cultures of East and West, won her the Pulitzer Prize in 2000 – but nothing prepared her for the experience of becoming a target for the Indian paparazzi.

Artistic licence: Indy a hero for old agers

Artistic licence: Indy a hero for old agers

The PR communications have been terse. All bags are to be searched before the screening, one e-mail informs you. Mobile phones should be left behind if possible and will not be allowed into the cinema, says another.

First person

First person

Scroobius Pip: 26, rapper

Artistic licence: Everyone’s a critic

Artistic licence: Everyone’s a critic

He was drunk, abrasive and, unfortunately, standing right next tome. ‘‘Your review of DJ Shadow was complete nonsense,” he shouted in my ear. ‘‘That album was genius. Genius!”

In the name of the daughter

In the name of the daughter

Daughter of Arthur Miller and wife of Daniel Day-Lewis, Rebecca Miller is determined to be judged on her own merits as a writer and film director.

Film: Post-punk biopic fails to rock

Film: Post-punk biopic fails to rock

Joy Division. Directed by Grant Gee

The Kooky crew

The Kooky crew

British outfit the Kooks are more interested in their music than in the trappings of success – and excess – that typically accompany a band riding the crest of a wave.

Don’t quote me

Don’t quote me

{ "#" : "Sally Hawkins, actress, 31, on . . ." , "b" : ". . . working on Little Britain"}

Artistic licence: The genre genie is born

Artistic licence: The genre genie is born

‘‘Math rock? What’s math rock again?” I said. ‘‘Doesn’t it have something to do with time signatures?” my music journalist friend replied, a vague hope flaring in his eyes. ‘‘I think bands like Battles and Explosions in the Sky play it,” I added.

The art of love

The art of love

Several years ago, my younger brother and I were driving home to Skibbereen from Cork city, whiling away the time listening to music.

Tainted love

Tainted love

Even when you’re a director as famous and well regarded as Mike Newell, there are some jobs that are hard to win.

Artistic licence: A moral rejection?

Artistic licence: A moral rejection?

Moral turpitude - that was the 19th century phrase that was employed last week by the Department of Homeland Security, to prevent British artist Sebastian Horsley from entering the United States to promote his book, Dandy of the Underworld.

Artistic licence: Reader’s block?

Artistic licence: Reader’s block?

Eight years ago, when I was a student on an M Phil. in creative writing, I was given a piece of advice by a visiting literary agent. If us female students on the course wanted to become successful in publishing literary fiction, he said, we should ch