Nadine O’Regan

Nadine O’Regan

Nadine O'Regan is Books and Arts Editor with The Sunday Business Post. Raised in Skibbereen, Co. Cork, she joined the paper as a freelancer contributor in 2000, after graduating with an M.Phil in Creative Writing from Trinity College Dublin. O'Regan has worked for publications including The Irish Times, The Irish Independent, Hot Press and Spin magazine (US), and served as a reporter for RTE's arts television programme The Works. A regular contributor to TV and radio shows, she also presents the Sunday evening programme Songs in the Key of Life on Irish radio station Today FM.

Andrew Scott: ‘You have to just be comfortable with being uncomfortable’

Andrew Scott: ‘You have to just be comfortable with being uncomfortable’

Scott is probably best known for his part as the villainous Moriarty in the hugely popular series Sherlock, but he has also gained plaudits for his stage work

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As Abba prepare to wave their über-hot Abbatar hologram selves (circa 1979) off on tour, what does it say about our need for a sense of community in an increasingly individualised world that old age, physical demise – even death – won’t stop the music?

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We’ve all heard the horror stories about mistreated tenants and wardrobes being rented out for two grand a month. But in the current climate, who’d be a landlord either?

The man who kept it country all the way

The man who kept it country all the way

In a world where the cult of the individual is prized, Big Tom McBride’s old-school values will be missed

Young at heart: Tim Wheeler

Young at heart: Tim Wheeler

Two decades after Downpatrick band Ash exploded onto the 1990s music landscape with their summery punk-inflected pop, the band are back with a new single and album

Best Irish writing now from women, says McCabe

Best Irish writing now from women, says McCabe

The writer behind The Butcher Boy and Breakfast on Pluto praises Sharon Horgan and Derry Girls, saying literary fiction has dwindled in popularity in recent years

The numbers game: An interview with the 202s

The numbers game: An interview with the 202s

Having generated lots of acclaim and won a record contract way back when, Irish indie-tronia band the 202s are now releasing their second album - nine years later. ‘We made five human beings since we last made a record,’ says frontman Mike Glennon - who has learned that the secret to making good music is to be in no rush

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In the 1960s nudity as a protest had some impact. Last week, however, the sight of a topless woman breaking through the barriers to protest against Bill Cosby smacked only of exhibitionism

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In the wake of the Belfast rape trial, it is clear that we need better sex education in schools – and that the new system should be monitored

Make me an island

Make me an island

It has its share of nightlife, but in truth Malta is a daytime type of destination: perfect for enjoying beautiful sunny afternoons, delicious cuisine and the occasional picturesque location for Game of Thrones

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The past is never past, not when the internet is around to remind us of it. And it makes our present more dangerous than we might like to imagine

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Facebook is in the dock for allowing nefarious third-parties to get their hands on our personal information. But who handed it over in the first place? And for the silliest of reasons

The Ryan line: Author Donal Ryan is not on easy street

The Ryan line: Author Donal Ryan is not on easy street

Ryan’s meteoric rise as a novelist has brought him awards and plaudits - but also considerable envy and snobbish backbiting

Author Donal Ryan vents at Leo Varadkar

Author Donal Ryan vents at Leo Varadkar

Taoiseach derided as ‘Fr Trendy’

Altan: Dreams and songs to sing

Altan: Dreams and songs to sing

With their new album The Gap of Dreams, Mairéad Ní Mhaonaigh and Altan have tapped into a seam of creativity inspired by their bygone musical idols to create something that is still very much in the here and now