Nadine O’Regan

Nadine O’Regan

Nadine O'Regan is Books and Arts Editor with The Sunday Business Post. Raised in Skibbereen, Co. Cork, she joined the paper as a freelancer contributor in 2000, after graduating with an M.Phil in Creative Writing from Trinity College Dublin. O'Regan has worked for publications including The Irish Times, The Irish Independent, Hot Press and Spin magazine (US), and served as a reporter for RTE's arts television programme The Works. A regular contributor to TV and radio shows, she also presents the Sunday evening programme Songs in the Key of Life on Irish radio station Today FM.

Wycherley’s way

Wycherley’s way

With vast experience on stage and screen behind him, Don Wycherley is moving into a new phase of his acting career.

Artistic licence: Eyes on the prize

Artistic licence: Eyes on the prize

The first text arrived just hours after the shortlist for this year’s Choice Music Prize was announced. ‘‘Turn your face to the wall,” it read. ‘‘No Future Kings of Spain? No A Lazarus Soul? Shame on you.” And with that (only half-joking) message, my

Artistic licence: Where there’s a Will.i.Am, there’s a way

Artistic licence: Where there’s a Will.i.Am, there’s a way

Who’d have thought it? Three weeks ago, the notion that Will.i.Am, the irritatingly-punctuated frontman of the Black Eyed Peas, would be the first pop star in recent times to release a politician-endorsing song that doesn’t make you want to chew off

Artistic licence: Creative rights

Artistic licence: Creative rights

So Martin Amis earns stg£3,000 an hour to teach creative writing to students at Manchester University.

Art for art’s sake weakens novel

Art for art’s sake weakens novel

My Tango With Barbara Strozzi. By Russell Hoban, Bloomsbury, €16.30

Artistic licence: Star-a-day mentality is killing modern music

Artistic licence: Star-a-day mentality is killing modern music

‘‘The new Amy Winehouse.” With apologies to Duffy, Adele and all the other pretty, talented and anodyne musicians vying for the Winehouse throne in 2008, if I have to hear or read that phrase one more time this month, I may scream.

Artistic Licence: Violence keeping crime at bay

Artistic Licence: Violence keeping crime at bay

When it comes to the thorny subject of the impact the arts has on our mental health, a brace of psychologists have been hard at work in recent years to suggest that the most dangerous thing we could do at the weekend is listen to thrash metal while c

Tales of Alice

Tales of Alice

Five years ago, Alice Sebold’s debut novel The Lovely Bones was given a rapturous reception. Her latest offering, The Almost Moon, has provoked almost entirely the opposite reaction from the critics, but the battering it has received doesn’t seem to

Don’t quote me

Don’t quote me

PJ Gallagher, comedian, on: Tricking celebrities for Naked Camera...

Don’t quote me

Don’t quote me

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Artistic Licence: Living with lists

Artistic Licence: Living with lists

Last month, when JK Rowling revealed that Dumbledore, her wise wizard from the Harry Potter novels, was gay, New York magazine and Radar magazine, two of America’s most zeitgeisty publications, began work on a couple of articles.

First person

First person

Paul Muldoon: poet, rock guitarist (56)

First person

First person

Pamela Des Barres: supergroupie, 59, California

First person

First person

Pamela Des Barres: supergroupie, 59, California

Don’t quote me

Don’t quote me

Stefan Ruzowitzky on . . . why we watch traumatic films