Nadine O’Regan

Nadine O’Regan

Nadine O'Regan is Books and Arts Editor with The Sunday Business Post. Raised in Skibbereen, Co. Cork, she joined the paper as a freelancer contributor in 2000, after graduating with an M.Phil in Creative Writing from Trinity College Dublin. O'Regan has worked for publications including The Irish Times, The Irish Independent, Hot Press and Spin magazine (US), and served as a reporter for RTE's arts television programme The Works. A regular contributor to TV and radio shows, she also presents the Sunday evening programme Songs in the Key of Life on Irish radio station Today FM.

Profile of Sally Rooney: Booking her place

Profile of Sally Rooney: Booking her place

At 27, Rooney is bringing out some of the most thought-provoking, challenging and intriguing fiction being published in Ireland currently

Queen of the sensual world

Queen of the sensual world

She released her debut single, Wuthering Heights, at 18 - and since then Kate Bush has created some of the most brilliant, surprising and beguiling pop music ever written. A true creative force of nature, as well as the possessor of that unmistakable voice, Bush turns 60 tomorrow - and she is still the pop artist to whom most others bow down, writes Nadine O’Regan

Off Message

Off Message

As Eamon Dunphy bowed out of television last week with a characteristic flourish, it seems sad that a younger generation of broadcasters and journalists have no licence to emulate his old-school audacity and originality

Here we are now, entertain us

Here we are now, entertain us

Frances Bean Cobain, daughter of Nirvana legend Kurt Cobain, led grunge fans in pilgrimage to Newbridge last week to launch an exhibition dedicated to her father’s life

Album review

Album review

INDIE ROCK Dirty Projectors: Lamp Lit Prose (Domino) Brooklyn’s Dirty Projectors can never be ...

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Off Message

There will always be those who decry a state drugs policy that informs as well as criminalises, but with cocaine and ketamine use spiralling, isn’t it time we made protecting people’s health more important than avoiding offence?

Iggy Pop a passenger on Underworld's journey

Iggy Pop a passenger on Underworld's journey

Two decades ago, Underworld ruled dance music and their 1996 piledriver Born Slippy was the soundtrack for a generation. Now they’re back, and they’ve got a very special guest on board

Exclusive: Frances Bean Cobain signs two-album deal with Columbia

Exclusive: Frances Bean Cobain signs two-album deal with Columbia

The daughter of Kurt Cobain readies herself for her first album release

Album Reviews

Album Reviews

SYNTH-INDIE Let’s Eat Grandma: I’m All Ears (Transgressive) Another day, another new buzz ba...

She’s Electric

She’s Electric

Ali Hardiman’s new play tells the story of two girls from vastly different backgrounds who forge a bond when they meet at Electric Picnic. And where’s it being staged? At Electric Picnic itself in September, of course

The long game: Mike McCormack

The long game: Mike McCormack

Galway-based novelist Mike McCormack is suddenly experiencing the full glare of success thanks to his novel Solar Bones. But it’s been a long, slow, sometimes unrewarding route to literary acclaim, he tells Nadine O’Regan

Off Message

Off Message

If we’re going to beat 2018’s stresses, we have to find increasingly outlandish ways to relax. So brace yourself for bootcamp, llamas, surfing and a dose of Michael D’s dogs

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Off Message

Pity the poor cold-caller. Even the most sociable of us do not want to talk to an anonymous representative of the companies we reluctantly deal with. But remember that they are human too

A lesson to be learned

A lesson to be learned

Never afraid to speak out against snobbery, injustice or social bias, actor and playwright Emmet Kirwan will be reaching a much larger audience with the new film version of his play Dublin Oldschool, writes Nadine O’Regan

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Off Message

The online shaming of Anthony Bourdain’s partner following the food author and TV presenter’s suicide is a grim reminder that we are living in the age of the Wild West internet