Nadine O’Regan

Nadine O’Regan

Nadine O'Regan is Books and Arts Editor with The Sunday Business Post. Raised in Skibbereen, Co. Cork, she joined the paper as a freelancer contributor in 2000, after graduating with an M.Phil in Creative Writing from Trinity College Dublin. O'Regan has worked for publications including The Irish Times, The Irish Independent, Hot Press and Spin magazine (US), and served as a reporter for RTE's arts television programme The Works. A regular contributor to TV and radio shows, she also presents the Sunday evening programme Songs in the Key of Life on Irish radio station Today FM.

Mary Black: ‘We get asked to sing together all the time. But no, it’s not going to happen.'

Mary Black: ‘We get asked to sing together all the time. But no, it’s not going to happen.'

Four decades into her illustrious career, music is still a family affair for Mary Black – but only up to a point, writes Nadine O’Regan

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The media have been getting their knickers in a knot over the opening of Ireland’s new Victoria’s Secret store. Personally, I’m delighted I don’t have to travel stateside for nice underwear, but I could do without the frothy, patronising PR spin

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As Meghan Markle readies herself for a starring role in Windsor Family Values and a life devoid of bellytops and privacy, it is the royal family who should count themselves lucky

The culture club

The culture club

Culture vultures have a rich selection of offerings to delve into this holiday season. Nadine O’Regan picks out some of 2017’s best works in the areas of pop culture, entertainment, memoir and beyond

Still rocking the boat

Still rocking the boat

Pugwash mainman Thomas Walsh knows what it’s like to suffer for his art - but he also knows what it’s like to hang out with rock titans like Jeff Lynne in LA, writes Nadine O’Regan

Fiction’s fantastic year

Fiction’s fantastic year

It’s been a bountiful year for brilliant new books from the world of fiction. Cast your eye upon the top fiction picks of the year, with Nadine O’Regan selecting her favourites

Lee Child: ‘You’ve got to write in a way that, in the reader’s head, something vivid is happening’

Lee Child: ‘You’ve got to write in a way that, in the reader’s head, something vivid is happening’

For someone who, by his own admission, has been ‘high since 1969’, the bestselling thriller writer Child is a sharp and articulate interviewee.

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Rather than wrinkle their noses at the prospect of the cosmetic treatment, critics ought to recognise that, just like hair dye and make-up, Botox is quite the leveller

Albums of the week

Albums of the week

Taylor Swift and Noel Gallagher's High Flying Birds

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Criticising Ireland is part of improving our country – which is something Irish officialdom should realise, instead of demanding that everyone pulls on the green jersey

Between rock and a hard place

Between rock and a hard place

Memoir: Rock Bottom, By Michael Odell, Icon Books, €19.55

He’s no ordinary Joe

He’s no ordinary Joe

It took Joe Hill some time to step out of the shadow of his famous father Stephen King, but the acclaimed novelist has since made plenty of literary waves of his own, writes Nadine O’Regan

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Modern life is a whirl of complications, making one long for the old joy of social spontaneity – yet another relic of the non-digital age

Nadine O’Regan On Michael Colgan

Nadine O’Regan On Michael Colgan

Bullying and the parable of the boiled frog

‘It was a natural thing to go to folk music, even though I swore as  a child that I wouldn’t’

‘It was a natural thing to go to folk music, even though I swore as a child that I wouldn’t’

As the daughter of a well-known musical family and muse to Ewan MacColl, Peggy Seeger was always going to make her mark in the folk music world