Nadine O’Regan

Nadine O’Regan

Nadine O'Regan is Books and Arts Editor with The Sunday Business Post. Raised in Skibbereen, Co. Cork, she joined the paper as a freelancer contributor in 2000, after graduating with an M.Phil in Creative Writing from Trinity College Dublin. O'Regan has worked for publications including The Irish Times, The Irish Independent, Hot Press and Spin magazine (US), and served as a reporter for RTE's arts television programme The Works. A regular contributor to TV and radio shows, she also presents the Sunday evening programme Songs in the Key of Life on Irish radio station Today FM.

Songs of experience: David Balfe on navigating grief through creativity

Songs of experience: David Balfe on navigating grief through creativity

David Balfe talks to Nadine O'Regan about his new project and album, For Those I Love

Escape into a book

Escape into a book

Nadine O’Regan and Andrew Lynch pick out 20 perfect reads for relaxing with during long summer days

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Stevie Wonder confused many fans when he took a break on Tuesday night to listen to a DJ playing other people’s music. But was the soul superstar motivated by a sense of community?

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Hotel designers are thrilling to the delights of visibility, but have they gone too far? Yes, yes they have

Unsung hero: Mic Christopher

Unsung hero: Mic Christopher

18 years after his tragic death in a freak accident, the life and times of singer-songwriter Mic Christopher are captured in a new biopic

Off message: We need to talk about porn

Off message: We need to talk about porn

We don’t like talking to our children about porn, but in the wake of the Ana Kriégel trial, it’s clear that it’s a conversation we simply must have. Because the consequences of ignoring the issue are too alarming

Scenes from the age of anxiety: Artist Brian Teeling on vulnerability

Scenes from the age of anxiety: Artist Brian Teeling on vulnerability

A crashed luxury car; a stash of photos from a non-suicide; a catalogue of assignations. Visual artist Brian Teeling’s current Imma exhibit takes a blunt look at maleness, intimacy, fear and his own inner life

Haunting, slow-paced award winner tells of love after the darkness

Haunting, slow-paced award winner tells of love after the darkness

Emily Ruskovich's Idaho is a narrative for readers who love to savour each word in a fiction, and who appreciate the value of a vividly etched description

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In her own low-key but resolute way, Philomena Lynott, who died last week aged 88, played an important part in changing the face of modern Ireland

Crazy days: Caroline O'Donoghue's tremendous, traumatic year

Crazy days: Caroline O'Donoghue's tremendous, traumatic year

The past year has been a rollercoaster of emotions for Caroline O’Donoghue, as the author and columnist dealt with family health crises and sudden job loss while also securing the ‘biggest book deal’ she may ever get

Androgynous vision: Irish artist David Booth

Androgynous vision: Irish artist David Booth

His first solo exhibition is called Typecast, but the characters in the portraits of Dublin painter David Booth are anything but

The word of pod: Nadine O'Regan on the Irish podcasting revolution

The word of pod: Nadine O'Regan on the Irish podcasting revolution

In the US, more people now listen to online podcasts than go to the cinema. In Ireland too, the phenomenon is growing at huge speed, with many well-known figures hopping aboard the bandwagon. Is it here to stay, or just a flash in the pan?

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New music is old hat – big stars are far too busy with biopics, tours, memoirs and investment portfolios to waste time on anything as unprofitable as an album

‘You’ve only got the one life. I’d rather be 37 and doing something I love, than be 37 and not have taken that chance’

‘You’ve only got the one life. I’d rather be 37 and doing something I love, than be 37 and not have taken that chance’

A latecomer to the world of comedy, Dublin stand-up Julie Jay is now grabbing her big chance with both hands, writes Nadine O’Regan

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Imagine if we had to sign waivers and disclaimers every time we walked out of our front door. That’s what could happen if compensation culture is allowed to flourish