James McDermott

James McDermott

The Dwyer Trial: The jury: the most serious decision they will ever take

The Dwyer Trial: The jury: the most serious decision they will ever take

Complex and sometimes harrowing evidence, long hours of boring or difficult details and one person’s fate in your hands, performing a juror’s duties is no easy task

McIlroy settlement is par for the course

McIlroy settlement is par for the course

Parties usually prefer to strike a deal than risk a judge’s whims

All human life exists here

All human life exists here

James McDermott With everything from littering to serious criminal cases before it, the District Court is hardly glamorous, but it is the engine that keeps our legal system running smoothly

Anglo Trial: Ignorance of the law is no excuse

Anglo Trial: Ignorance of the law is no excuse

Corporate Ireland will be paying close attention to the exacting standards expected of company directors

Garda crisis: Doubts now cast over many convictions

Garda crisis: Doubts now cast over many convictions

The possibility that calls between lawyers and clients were recorded is deeply disturbing, writes James McDermott.

Referendum a bid to clear Supreme Court logjam

Referendum a bid to clear Supreme Court logjam

The vast majority of the Supreme Court's workload involves appeals from routine civil cases, writes James McDermott.

Legal system unfit to prosecute complex cases

Legal system unfit to prosecute complex cases

James McDermott examines what lessons can be learned for financial-related prosecutions of the future.

The tapes, the trials and our criminal justice system

The tapes, the trials and our criminal justice system

After two weeks of wall-to-wall coverage of the Anglo tapes, there has been much discussion of their impact on future criminal prosecutions, writes James McDermott.

Fingleton Files: The legal angle

Fingleton Files: The legal angle

Being a director of a company carries with it many responsibilities which office-holders must uphold - or face the weight of the law, writes James McDermott.

It's far from a Dunne deal

It's far from a Dunne deal

Sean Dunne's strenuous efforts to get himself declared bankrupt in the US will witness a few more twists and turns before he learns his fate, writes James McDermott.

How the courts deal with contempt

How the courts deal with contempt

There are a wide range of reasons for which someone could be held in contempt of court, yet a prison offence is rare - and should not be taken lightly, writes James McDermott.

Comment

Comment

Legal eagles circle Carroll decision

Minister needs to move quickly on college fees

Minister needs to move quickly on college fees

You would think that the students who got their Leaving Certificate results last Wednesday have enough problems on their plate, with the recession making most third-level courses seem unlikely to lead to paid employment any time soon. The only growth

Courts unwilling to dictate to state

Courts unwilling to dictate to state

Cian and Yvonne O’ Cuanachain were told in the High Court last week they would have to cover their own costs of a failed action against the state on behalf of their six-year-old autistic son, Sean. James McDermott examines the legal perils of taking

Comment: Despite the hype, barristers are not such avaricious fat-cats

Comment: Despite the hype, barristers are not such avaricious fat-cats

I was recently reminded of a lucrative lecture tour undertaken by physicist Max Planck in the aftermath of his being awarded the Nobel prize.