Elaine Byrne

Elaine Byrne

Dr. Elaine Byrne is a barrister. She is a lecturer in law at the Institute of Technology, Carlow. Elaine has held academic appointments as a political scientist with Trinity College Dublin and the University of New South Wales. She has worked as a governance consultant for the European Commission, United Nations Anti-Corruption Unit and the World Bank. She is the author of the bestselling book, Political Corruption in Ireland 1922-2010: A Crooked Harp?

Promises in the Constitution won’t build any more houses

Promises in the Constitution won’t build any more houses

Sinn Féin’s bid to get housing rights into the Constitution has failed in the Dáil. But the reality is that a right to a home would be meaningless if it could not be delivered on

Jackson outcry shows a shift from due process to social media spleen

Jackson outcry shows a shift from due process to social media spleen

Social media anger at the news that former Ulster rugby player Paddy Jackson is to join London Irish seems to indicate a shift towards believing alleged victims unconditionally and without scrutiny

Vaccination laws and education must go hand in hand

Vaccination laws and education must go hand in hand

We need to keep measles inoculation rates up, but steps should also be taken to allay the concerns of parents who believe the unscientific claims of anti-vaxxers

Is our system of local democracy merely a sham?

Is our system of local democracy merely a sham?

Next month’s local election may record the lowest ever turnout in the history of the state. You can understand why

After the trauma of Tuam, the lingering silence brings more pain

After the trauma of Tuam, the lingering silence brings more pain

We still do not know the burial location of thousands of children who died in mother and baby homes. The tragedy is that there are people who do know and who have not come forward

FAI circus shows limitations of Oireachtas committees

FAI circus shows limitations of Oireachtas committees

There are more effective means of investigating the football association’s finances and workings

How trumped-up rumours become fake news

How trumped-up rumours become fake news

The school patronage ‘crisis’, entirely self-created by a handful of interested parties, is a grim reminder of how quickly fear and misinformation can be weaponised

Why are we leaving divorce in the Constitution at all?

Why are we leaving divorce in the Constitution at all?

We’re being asked to remove the minimum living-apart period. But that will leave other provisions on divorce in the Constitution that have no place there at all

If you stand by and do nothing, are you complicit?

If you stand by and do nothing, are you complicit?

Did Fine Gael wait until it was politically safe to reject Hungarian far-right leader Viktor Orbán?

New tariffs evoke ruinous Economic War of 1930s

New tariffs evoke ruinous Economic War of 1930s

The British government’s proposed rules on imports in the event of a no-deal Brexit have serious implications for Irish agriculture

Why Yates is far from alone in his anti-‘Nordie’ point of view


Why Yates is far from alone in his anti-‘Nordie’ point of view


Despite aspiring to a united Ireland, many people ‘down here’ privately share radio host Ivan Yates’s prejudice. We should ditch the partitionism and realise that, in a republic, all citizens must be equal


Ross, McDonald and McGuinness go strangely silent after ruling

Ross, McDonald and McGuinness go strangely silent after ruling

Anyone who believes in due process and fairness should welcome the Supreme Court’s recent decision that the PAC was out of line on Rehab

Britain cannot wash its hands of problems that created Isis bride

Britain cannot wash its hands of problems that created Isis bride

The home secretary Sajid Javid tried to export the teenager to Bangladesh, a country she has never visited, rather than allow her to be judged by a British court. Is this in the public interest?

The shortage of judges has grave implications not only for Irish litigants, but for our trust in the justice system as a whole

The shortage of judges has grave implications not only for Irish litigants, but for our trust in the justice system as a whole

Is the Irish justice system in crisis? A High Court judge announced last week that there are not ...

History repeats itself in our housing policy

History repeats itself in our housing policy

It’s the 1960s again as we see a perfect storm of a booming but precarious economy, a housing shortage and a rising population in Dublin - yet the public sector standards bill is languishing