Elaine Byrne

Elaine Byrne

Dr. Elaine Byrne is a barrister. She is a lecturer in law at the Institute of Technology, Carlow. Elaine has held academic appointments as a political scientist with Trinity College Dublin and the University of New South Wales. She has worked as a governance consultant for the European Commission, United Nations Anti-Corruption Unit and the World Bank. She is the author of the bestselling book, Political Corruption in Ireland 1922-2010: A Crooked Harp?

The shortage of judges has grave implications not only for Irish litigants, but for our trust in the justice system as a whole

The shortage of judges has grave implications not only for Irish litigants, but for our trust in the justice system as a whole

Is the Irish justice system in crisis? A High Court judge announced last week that there are not ...

History repeats itself in our housing policy

History repeats itself in our housing policy

It’s the 1960s again as we see a perfect storm of a booming but precarious economy, a housing shortage and a rising population in Dublin - yet the public sector standards bill is languishing

The sheikh, the farmers and the generous CAP

The sheikh, the farmers and the generous CAP

Some of the wealthiest people in the world, including Sheikh Mohammed, benefit from EU farm subsidies

There should be no topic too dangerous for TV

There should be no topic too dangerous for TV

One minute’s worth of controversial remarks rightly didn’t deter 368,000 viewers from watching a useful report on transgender issues

The European Parliament is the Seanad on steroids

The European Parliament is the Seanad on steroids

Neither Irish political parties nor Irish voters seem to care about this year’s European Parliament elections, despite what they mean for us

State’s homelessness failures are no free licence  for charities

State’s homelessness failures are no free licence for charities

As Conor Skehan suggests, our homeless charities need to be more efficient at what they do, because they’re wasting limited resources

The forgotten Jewish heroes of the War of Independence

The forgotten Jewish heroes of the War of Independence

The centenary commemorations give us a chance to look at neglected narratives in Irish history, including the role played by members of one particular community

The case for legalising weed for recreational use

The case for legalising weed for recreational use

Now that it’s legal in much of North America, big business, including Guinness owner Diageo, is considering investing in marijuana as a product. Isn’t it time we too looked into it?

We can become ethical carnivores

We can become ethical carnivores

We meat-eaters have become divorced from the reality of where our food comes from. That’s bad for animals, and for us

The great recession and the great forgetting

The great recession and the great forgetting

The Central Bank fined a former Irish Nationwide executive €23,000 last week. Hardly anybody noticed. And therein lies the problem

An Ireland of the welcomes for money-launderers

An Ireland of the welcomes for money-launderers

The same qualities that have earned us high marks for 'ease of doing business' are increasingly attracting drug cartels, and worse

To win, it helps to have a gameplan

To win, it helps to have a gameplan

The current form of the national rugby team and the national football team couldn’t be more different. The IRFU has a long-term, big picture strategy. But what of the FAI?

Money speaks loudest in democracy’s moral maze

Money speaks loudest in democracy’s moral maze

The murder of Jamal Khashoggi and other Saudi excesses won’t be allowed to hurt trade with the desert kingdom either in the US or here

Watching his own life unfold, at home over a cup of tea

Watching his own life unfold, at home over a cup of tea

It was seeing Maurice McCabe’s sheer ordinariness - as portrayed in last week’s RTÉ documentary - that allowed us to grasp the extraordinary nature of his courage

The carpenter from Carlow who walked through hell

The carpenter from Carlow who walked through hell

My great-grandfather joined the Dublin Fusiliers and survived a gas attack on Easter Week 1916 which killed 538 Irishmen. He was wounded at Ypres. And when the war ended he never came home