Dermot Bolger

Dermot Bolger

The inner voice of the tribe that drives our evolution

The inner voice of the tribe that drives our evolution

Wired for Culture: The Natural History of Human Cooperation by Mark Pagel. Allen Lane, €31.50. Reviewed by Dermot Bolger.

How a stunning Meadow became a killing field

How a stunning Meadow became a killing field

The Meadow: Kashmir 1995 - Where the Terror Began by Adrian Levy and Cathy Scott-Clark. Harper Press, €21.40. Reviewed by Dermot Bolger.

From IRA’s ‘chosen one’ to international statesman

From IRA’s ‘chosen one’ to international statesman

By Caoimhe Nic Dhábhéid Liverpool University Press, €81.90 Seán MacBride A Republican Life: 1904-1946

Lemass’s ruthless streak laid bare

Lemass’s ruthless streak laid bare

Sean Lemass: Democratic Dictator By Bryce Evans Collins Press, €15

Moving story of a family’s London-Irish experience

Moving story of a family’s London-Irish experience

All families have stories, and most especially large emigrant families whose members have each made singular journeys (financed by older, already departed siblings) at different times to be reunited in a place of exile or of economic and sexual liber

Love letters paint a much bigger picture

Love letters paint a much bigger picture

WB Yeats & George Yeats, The Letters. Oxford University Press, €31.50

How the west won – but isn’t winning any more

How the west won – but isn’t winning any more

When Mahatma Gandhi was once asked by a reporter what he thought of western civilisation, he famously replied - with delicate irony - that he thought it would be a good idea. Kenneth Clarke had no sense of irony when, in 1969, he made his famous tele

Poets divided by styles, but united by talent

Poets divided by styles, but united by talent

Poetry exists in every generation, often as invisible but as essential as plankton.

The village that beat two empires

The village that beat two empires

If the Siege of Kohima isn’t as instantly recognisable to western ears as earlier battles involving similarly catastrophic slaughter - like the Gallipoli landings or the nightmarish Third Battle of Ypres - it may be because of the fact that the bulk

The society beauty and the fascist dictator

The society beauty and the fascist dictator

History has a way of immortalising people based not just on what they do, but on when they do it.

Grim tale of Franklin’s frozen food

Grim tale of Franklin’s frozen food

The concept of the noble failure is deeply embedded in our psyches. Even today, Captain Robert Falcon Scott is viewed as a greater hero for his disastrous expedition to the South Pole than Norwegian Roald Amundsen - who competently (and with no loss

Compromise and defiance in Nazi Paris

Compromise and defiance in Nazi Paris

It’s easy for us now to say what we would all have done when faced with certain situations during World War II, be cause World War II is safely over. But if Ireland had been invaded, do we really know what decisions we would have made if faced with t

A glimpse into the private lives of writers

A glimpse into the private lives of writers

There are several distinct types of writing that creative writers do. First and foremost, there is what they might call ‘‘the work’’.

Freedom to dream in unfamiliar surroundings

Freedom to dream in unfamiliar surroundings

Few debuts in Irish fiction were as welcomed as Notes from a Turkish Whorehouse, Philip O’Ceallaigh’s rich kaleidoscope of a collection, which was published in 2006 and featured characters of multiple nationalities from many different social classes,

The bitter taste of victory

The bitter taste of victory

Few accounts of the final stand by the leaders of the 1916 Easter Rising on Dublin’s Moore Street bother to mention Bridget McKane, a 16year-old girl who was sheltering with her family when their cottage door was shot open by a volunteer, who killed