Brian Keegan

Brian Keegan

The Tax Take with Brian Keegan: Getting the balance wrong on both sides of the pond

The Tax Take with Brian Keegan: Getting the balance wrong on both sides of the pond

The tax incentive regime is going too far in the States, while the EU has been over-zealous in regulating competition

Are you being served? Not after Brexit

Are you being served? Not after Brexit

The British government’s post-Brexit customs proposals, published last week, are little short o...

Brexit havoc won’t stop at the backstop

Brexit havoc won’t stop at the backstop

Focus on the border has deflected attention from the meat of the withdrawal agreement, which British civil servants warn will cause ruinous disruption in a no-deal scenario

All hail the Brexit Omnibus Bill

All hail the Brexit Omnibus Bill

The bill designed to curb the worst excesses of bureaucracy which will attend Britain’s withdrawal from the EU is both necessary and surprisingly streamlined

Protectionism on the rise

Protectionism on the rise

The timing - on the brink of Brexit - of the Department of Finance’s public consultation on anti-transfer pricing tax rules is not ideal

Digital taxation rules could hit Ireland harder

Digital taxation rules could hit Ireland harder

It is crucial for companies with international trade to engage with the OECD, to ensure Irish interests are not hampered

If a tax dodge looks too good to be true, it probably is

If a tax dodge looks too good to be true, it probably is

Governments guard PAYE tax jealously – but the British Revenue’s clampdown on a long-running avoidance scheme is so draconian that it has lost political support

Brexit Britain in danger of grinding to a halt

Brexit Britain in danger of grinding to a halt

A no-deal scenario could crush importers and exporters under an unworkable mountain of paperwork, despite the best efforts of Whitehall civil servants

When is a border not a border?

When is a border not a border?

A no-deal Brexit will inevitably mean border controls on the island of Ireland, but in many cases these could be enforced by self-assessment and advance declarations

The EU doesn’t make it easy for us to like it

The EU doesn’t make it easy for us to like it

Needless and unjustified proposals on tax only feed the sort of antipathy that brought about Brexit

US-style shutdown is just what Brexit needs

US-style shutdown is just what Brexit needs

The suspension of government services in the US has nothing to recommend it, except that it forces hard political decisions to be taken

The Tax Take: A money-back guarantee?

The Tax Take: A money-back guarantee?

Using the tax system to change people’s behaviour doesn’t always have the desired effect

Braced for a Brexit blow to tax yield

Braced for a Brexit blow to tax yield

The looming Apple case is a threat to robust corporation tax policy, but the income tax regime is unlikely to change much in 2019

Out of the blue and into the backstop

Out of the blue and into the backstop

Most backstops are devised to guard against mishaps, but the Brexit one is a child of mutual suspicion

Just why is corporation tax so volatile?

Just why is corporation tax so volatile?

Almost €1 out of every €5 collected in Ireland in 2018 is paid as corporation tax, but we don’t seem to be very good at forecasting it