Andrew Lynch

Andrew Lynch

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Waiting for something like Godot, in lonely rural squalor

Waiting for something like Godot, in lonely rural squalor

If the makers of From Under the Bed ever want a snappy strapline for their posters, they might consider 'Waiting for Godot meets D’Unbelievables'

A high-flying feminist call to arms, but also a flawed drama

A high-flying feminist call to arms, but also a flawed drama

I See You By Amy de Bhrún Theatre Upstairs @ Lanigan’s Bar, Eden Quay, Dublin Rating: *** Runs...

Shining a sardonic light on loyalism’s bitter body politic

Shining a sardonic light on loyalism’s bitter body politic

At the heart of David Ireland’s remarkable play Cyprus Avenue lies a deadly serious question: has sectarianism become so deeply rooted in Northern society that some people simply cannot function without it?

Powerful and poignant portrayal of a fractured midlands family

Powerful and poignant portrayal of a fractured midlands family

On Raftery’s Hill is a truly horrifying portrayal of incest, repression and misogyny that arguably feels more relevant now than when it was first performed in 2000

Sondheim stares down the barrel of the American Dream

Sondheim stares down the barrel of the American Dream

A clever, stylish and hugely entertaining spectacle that hits the target with deadly accuracy

Bibi: A ‘man of destiny’ whose legacy is a fractured Israel

Bibi: A ‘man of destiny’ whose legacy is a fractured Israel

Benjamin Netanyahu's ultimate legacy will not be a more secure nation, but a deeply fractured Israeli society living behind walls

Harrowing but admirable play takes a searing look at autism

Harrowing but admirable play takes a searing look at autism

First performed at last year’s Dublin Fringe Festival, Normal is a drama that asks its audiences plenty of questions

Anatomy of a national tragedy waiting to happen

Anatomy of a national tragedy waiting to happen

For Irish conspiracy theorists, few subjects have provided more fertile ground than the killing of Michael Collins at Béal na Bláth on August 22, 1922

Accentuate the positive by sticking up for the facts

Accentuate the positive by sticking up for the facts

The content of Factfulness can often be revelatory and convincing

Worthy but heartfelt drama is a timely reminder of the Troubles

Worthy but heartfelt drama is a timely reminder of the Troubles

Gerard Humphreys' work always has an earnest quality that deserves full respect

Six counties, 20 vital books

Six counties, 20 vital books

From Blair to de Bréadún, McKittrick to Moloney, Andrew Lynch presents a selection of the best books about the Northern conflict

Enchanting performances that sweeten light but lovely romance

Enchanting performances that sweeten light but lovely romance

Lyrics has its fair share of blemishes – but driven by two hugely appealing performances at this intimate venue, it exudes a winsome charm that compensates for any thin patches

Economics and history collide to teach us some new lessons

Economics and history collide to teach us some new lessons

Although Linda Yueh's prose can be a little dry in places, she does, thankfully, find space for human details such as Smith banging his head against a wall while dictating The Wealth of Nations

Powerful performances that mask the Bard missing a beat

Powerful performances that mask the Bard missing a beat

Unfortunately, no amount of clever stagecraft can completely gloss over The Rape of Lucrece’s obvious shortcomings

Sixties kitchen-sink revival finds its feet after a slow start

Sixties kitchen-sink revival finds its feet after a slow start

The Unmanageable Sisters is a vibrant but muddled portrayal of 15 working-class women who could be ruling the world – if only Ireland’s patriarchal society hadn’t reduced them to what they agree is 'a dreary, rotten life'